omg i’m loved

omg i’m loved

1 year ago with 1 note

Anonymous said:  omgomgomg u know, u kinda look like katniss in the movies?

Seriously, anon, you can have whatever you want. ily.

1 year ago with 1 note

HELLO AGAIN LOVELY FOLLOWERS. what lovely feather should i get tattooe’d  as the quill for my ‘always’ tat i’m getting over the summer?

1 year ago with 4 notes

Opinions? 

How would you guys feel if I started doing promos? Just like once a week maybe? Idk, I haven’t decided. Message me your opinions! Thanks!

1 year ago with 0 notes

Anyone live in one of these districts now? I’m in four!

Anyone live in one of these districts now? I’m in four!

1 year ago with 18 notes

Hey guys, so I am looking for another topic to write a response to, similar to my responses of Jennifer Lawrence being fat and The Hunger Games not having social relevance. However, I’m not too sure what to write about. I was thinking a response to societies general reaction to the series since its rise to popularity? I know a lot of people are trying to spin it in a way to blame all of the worlds problems on childrens anger. Anyways, I would love some suggestions if you guys know of anything you’d like written about, so answer here or shoot me a message. It would be seriously appreciated! Any ideas?

1 year ago with 0 notes

For the anon who just asked if I follow back (I accidently clicked delete), I don’t automatically follow back, but if you want me to, I’ll totally check out your blog and follow if i like it.

2 years ago with 0 notes

"It’s hard enough to write decent novels. They needn’t always be revolutionary social commentary too. "
The Hunger Games has been marketing extreme amounts of attention in the recent months, starting with the ostentatious, yet well done advertising campaign to its recent record breaking release in theatres across the world. However, for some reason it has also been raking in its fair share of criticism, mostly on things that are irrelevant and unnnessecary. The highlight of these topics is audiences apparent distaste for the use of black actors in the roles of Rue, Thresh and Cinna, as well as Jennifer Lawrence’s perfectly healthy body being “too big”. However, it now appears the focus has been shifted away from the film and back to the novels in and of themselves. A recent article published in The Vancouver Sun by Kat Heartfield states that “Katniss has no ambition” and continues to compare the series by Suzanne Collins to both Harry Potter and Twilight, casting both of the latter two in a much more admirable light than that of the Hunger Games.The article opens with the quote, “If you know anything about The Hunger Games books and movie, you know the protagonist is a 16-year-old girl who hunts and fights at least as much as she swoons and gets rescued”. Upon reading this, one can almost begin to believe that this can be a compliment, however it falls in to the same genre as “You look so much healthier now that your boyfriend left you”! So basically, it is a backhanded punch to the face. Hunts and fights at least as much as she swoons and gets rescued. A fairly rough mental count of The Hunger Games leaves the Hunting&Fighting to Swooning&Getting rescued ratio at about 19:4, and that’s if her backpack taking a knife instead of her constitutes as being rescued. On a similar note, with absolutely no hatred aimed at Peeta, it is his character who covers the swooning and getting rescued in this novel. Perhaps the media could try a different approach? One that doesn’t feel the need to paint any genuinely strong willed woman as being silly and girlish as well? Perhaps one of the most frustrating things about the media and journalistic response to the Hunger Games is critics need to compare it with Harry Potter and/or Twilight. Whilst doing so, Kat Heartfield states that “Bella’s main decision is whether to hook up with the sensitive vampire or the brooding werewolf. Katniss faces a similar dilemma: will she choose the sensitive artist or the brooding hunter?”. First off, Peeta is not an artist, he’s a baker with awesome icing skills, but that’s irrelevant. Kat Heartfield’s only proof to back this point up does not even come from the book, it comes from the medias well strung advertising campaign in order to attract a target audience. This audience is clearly young girls between the ages of 12-17 who thrive off of the idea of a good love triangle. These teens are the equivalent of good revenue and a large part of the reason why The Hunger Games is now the third highest grossing opening movie in the world. So, no, Miss. Heartfield, Katniss does not face a similar dilemma to Bella. Most of her romance with Peeta in the first and second novels is based off of the primal need for survival and the obvious knowledge that their survival depends on them “being in love”. Yes, romance is a key plot point to The Hunger Games series, but it is used as a tool and not a driving factor.Kat Heartfield continues to states her opinions of The Hunger Games and it’s lack of affect on social conscious by discussing how Katniss “moons on” in the series that she does not want to get married, have children or fall in love. Katniss mentions these things in such blatant terms five times (maybe) in the entire book series. As well, Heartfield states that Katnisss must not know about birth control as she clumps the three aforementioned actions together. Suzanne Collins implications in the Hunger Games are that when one marries, it is socially and possibly politically expected to have a child, or hell, wouldn’t all the District’s be boycotting babies? And if not, then birth control probably doesn’t exist in this society. Either way, both arguments make Heartfield’s point null and void. Also, Katnisss makes it inextricably clear in the novels that she is more than willing to fall in love, but cannot risk anyone’s safety.In the article, Heartfield says ”I don’t think it’s coincidental that this highly successful young-adult fiction has plenty of gore but very little sex”. This statement does not compute with her omniscient argument of social impressions. At what point did sex become irrelevant in this day and age for the young adult crowd’s social consciousness? The most prominent viewers for shows such as Jersey Shore, Gossip Girl and Vampire Diaries are the same young adults as those reading and watching The Hunger Games. If this argument is to prove true, wouldn’t it make sense that The Hunger Games would flop due to its blatant lack of sex?In the closing paragraph of this article, Kat Heartfield says that The Hunger Games’ heroine has no ambitions and that this series has created absolutely no controversy or discussion of women’s roles and social change in today’s society. Sure, a bunch of important men aren’t sitting around a table right now, discussing the impact The Hunger Games will have on the world’s Global Crisis’, but these books have done what many, Harry Potter included, have failed to. Suzanne Collins has educated and made young adults and children inquire about what “norms” might be doing to today’s society. The Hunger Games is not a far stretch from this day and age’s obsession with reality television, the strings that Politicians can pull and the truly disturbing need for revenge and order that is already ingrained in society. So maybe this book series won’t start a revolution, but it has young adults and children thinking about the repercussions of decisions made today. If that’s not a social impact, I’m not quite sure what is.
What do you think?


"It’s hard enough to write decent novels. They needn’t always be revolutionary social commentary too. "

The Hunger Games has been marketing extreme amounts of attention in the recent months, starting with the ostentatious, yet well done advertising campaign to its recent record breaking release in theatres across the world. However, for some reason it has also been raking in its fair share of criticism, mostly on things that are irrelevant and unnnessecary. The highlight of these topics is audiences apparent distaste for the use of black actors in the roles of Rue, Thresh and Cinna, as well as Jennifer Lawrence’s perfectly healthy body being “too big”.

 However, it now appears the focus has been shifted away from the film and back to the novels in and of themselves. A recent article published in The Vancouver Sun by Kat Heartfield states that “Katniss has no ambition” and continues to compare the series by Suzanne Collins to both Harry Potter and Twilight, casting both of the latter two in a much more admirable light than that of the Hunger Games.

The article opens with the quote, “If you know anything about The Hunger Games books and movie, you know the protagonist is a 16-year-old girl who hunts and fights at least as much as she swoons and gets rescued”. Upon reading this, one can almost begin to believe that this can be a compliment, however it falls in to the same genre as “You look so much healthier now that your boyfriend left you”! So basically, it is a backhanded punch to the face. Hunts and fights at least as much as she swoons and gets rescued. A fairly rough mental count of The Hunger Games leaves the Hunting&Fighting to Swooning&Getting rescued ratio at about 19:4, and that’s if her backpack taking a knife instead of her constitutes as being rescued. On a similar note, with absolutely no hatred aimed at Peeta, it is his character who covers the swooning and getting rescued in this novel. Perhaps the media could try a different approach? One that doesn’t feel the need to paint any genuinely strong willed woman as being silly and girlish as well?

Perhaps one of the most frustrating things about the media and journalistic response to the Hunger Games is critics need to compare it with Harry Potter and/or Twilight. Whilst doing so, Kat Heartfield states that “Bella’s main decision is whether to hook up with the sensitive vampire or the brooding werewolf. Katniss faces a similar dilemma: will she choose the sensitive artist or the brooding hunter?”. First off, Peeta is not an artist, he’s a baker with awesome icing skills, but that’s irrelevant. Kat Heartfield’s only proof to back this point up does not even come from the book, it comes from the medias well strung advertising campaign in order to attract a target audience. This audience is clearly young girls between the ages of 12-17 who thrive off of the idea of a good love triangle. These teens are the equivalent of good revenue and a large part of the reason why The Hunger Games is now the third highest grossing opening movie in the world.

So, no, Miss. Heartfield, Katniss does not face a similar dilemma to Bella. Most of her romance with Peeta in the first and second novels is based off of the primal need for survival and the obvious knowledge that their survival depends on them “being in love”. Yes, romance is a key plot point to The Hunger Games series, but it is used as a tool and not a driving factor.

Kat Heartfield continues to states her opinions of The Hunger Games and it’s lack of affect on social conscious by discussing how Katniss “moons on” in the series that she does not want to get married, have children or fall in love. Katniss mentions these things in such blatant terms five times (maybe) in the entire book series. As well, Heartfield states that Katnisss must not know about birth control as she clumps the three aforementioned actions together. Suzanne Collins implications in the Hunger Games are that when one marries, it is socially and possibly politically expected to have a child, or hell, wouldn’t all the District’s be boycotting babies? And if not, then birth control probably doesn’t exist in this society. Either way, both arguments make Heartfield’s point null and void. Also, Katnisss makes it inextricably clear in the novels that she is more than willing to fall in love, but cannot risk anyone’s safety.

In the article, Heartfield says ”I don’t think it’s coincidental that this highly successful young-adult fiction has plenty of gore but very little sex”. This statement does not compute with her omniscient argument of social impressions. At what point did sex become irrelevant in this day and age for the young adult crowd’s social consciousness? The most prominent viewers for shows such as Jersey Shore, Gossip Girl and Vampire Diaries are the same young adults as those reading and watching The Hunger Games. If this argument is to prove true, wouldn’t it make sense that The Hunger Games would flop due to its blatant lack of sex?

In the closing paragraph of this article, Kat Heartfield says that The Hunger Games’ heroine has no ambitions and that this series has created absolutely no controversy or discussion of women’s roles and social change in today’s society. Sure, a bunch of important men aren’t sitting around a table right now, discussing the impact The Hunger Games will have on the world’s Global Crisis’, but these books have done what many, Harry Potter included, have failed to. Suzanne Collins has educated and made young adults and children inquire about what “norms” might be doing to today’s society. The Hunger Games is not a far stretch from this day and age’s obsession with reality television, the strings that Politicians can pull and the truly disturbing need for revenge and order that is already ingrained in society. So maybe this book series won’t start a revolution, but it has young adults and children thinking about the repercussions of decisions made today. If that’s not a social impact, I’m not quite sure what is.

What do you think?

2 years ago with 13 notes

“A few years ago, Ms. Lawrence might have looked hungry enough to play Katniss, but now, at 21, her seductive, womanly figure makes a bad fit for a dystopian fantasy about a people starved into submission,”

 This is the quote that was written in the Globe and Mail by Manohla Dargis concerning Jennifer Lawrence’s body as a portrayal of Katniss Everdeen in The Hunger Games film. This is not the first time Lawrence has been insulted or challenged for the shape of her body in these films. At one point, in an unnamed interview, the interviewer said to Jennifer “You have a much larger and different body shape than a lot of mainstream actresses right now”. Another article, just released by Daily Mail was headed with the title “Jennifer Lawrence too FAT for Hunger Games? Male critics believe so!”.

 Let’s make one thing clear; Jennifer Lawrence is not too fat, too curvy, too chubby or too active for anything, let alone playing Katniss in the Hunger Games.
 First off, Katniss is a hunter. Although it is widely discussed in the novels that food in District 12 is scarce, Katniss hunts all her own food with Gale. She is probably much better fed than many other for this simple reason. As well, Jennifer Lawrence has muscle mass which is a large contributor to her curvaceous figure, the second reason being that she is anatomically female. Are critics trying to argue that as a hunter who spends almost every day in the forest, Katniss wouldn’t have any muscle on her frame?

 Andrew O’Hehir said, after describing Lawrence as brilliant that “they look as well-fed and runway-ready in the second half of the movie as they did at the beginning”. My question is whether or not O’Hehir read the novels before making this comment. In direct reference to novel, it is stated that Katniss gains weight while in the capitol and looses it again once she leaves for the games. That would suggest she would be at a similar weight throughout the entire movie.

 Perhaps the most infuriating part about all of this is that these arguments and statements are almost wholly made my male critics. At what point did it become okay for men to police women’s bodies and tell them what they should look like? The exact date would be impossible to track because it has been happening for as long as anyone can remember. What is even more frustrating? These same male critics describe Liam Hemsworth’s body as “fitting the bill” and Josh Hutcherson as being “too small”. Let me get this straight; A healthy woman is fat. One healthy man is perfect, and another healthy man needs to put on even more bulk in order to “fit the bill”.  Did I miss the part where Katniss, Peeta and Gale suddenly don’t all live in the same “starved” district?

 Does the media not understand how much of a fantastic female influence the character of Katniss Everdeen is on girls everywhere, young and old? From her responses to these questions, it seems like Jennifer Lawrence should be an equally influential role model. Her responses to these comments were “I don’t diet. I exercise, you can’t work when you’re hungry, you know?” and “I’m okay with looking chubby on screen if I look like a real person face to face”. Thank you Jennifer Lawrence for putting your voice out there.

 Jennifer Lawrence is so beautiful and in such incredibly good shape, if this is the definition of “fat” these days, than perhaps more women should aim for “fat” and less for “skinny”.

What do you think?

2 years ago with 62 notes